FSF Europe

Vous êtes ici

S'abonner à flux FSF Europe FSF Europe
News from the Free Software Foundation Europe
Mis à jour : il y a 1 heure 6 min

Radio Lockdown: Current Status of Your Device Freedom

lun, 11/12/2017 - 18:00
Radio Lockdown: Current Status of Your Device Freedom

For more than two years the Free Software Foundation Europe has worked on the issue of Radio Lockdown introduced by a European directive which may hinder users to load software on their radio devices like mobile phones, laptops and routers. We have informed the public and talked to decision makers to fix critical points of the directive. There is still much to do to protect freedom and IT security in our radio devices. Read about the latest proceedings and the next steps.

In 2014, the European Parliament passed the Radio Equipment Directive which, among other regulations, make vendors of radio hardware responsible for preventing users from installing software which may alter the devices' radio parameters to break applicable radio regulations. While we share the desire to keep radio frequencies clean, the directive's approach will have negative implications on users' rights and Free Software, fair competition, innovation and the environment – mostly without equal benefits for security.

[R]adio equipment [shall support] certain features in order to ensure that software can only be loaded into the radio equipment where the compliance of the combination of the radio equipment and software has been demonstrated. – Article 3(3)(i) of the Radio Equipment Directive 2014/53/EU

This concern is shared by more than 50 organisations and businesses which signed our Joint Statement against Radio Lockdown, a result of our ongoing exchange and cooperation with the Free Software community in Europe and beyond.

The Radio Equipment Directive was put in effect in June 2017, but the classes of devices affected by the controversial Article 3(3)(i), which causes the Radio Lockdown, have not yet been defined. This means the directive doesn't concern any existing hardware yet. The definition of what hardware devices are covered will be decided on by the European Commission through a delegated act and is expected to be finished at the earliest by the end of 2018.

The Commission shall be empowered to adopt delegated acts in accordance with Article 44 specifying which categories or classes of radio equipment are concerned by each of the requirements [...] – Article 3(3), paragraph 2 of 2014/53/EU

However, that list is already being prepared in the Expert Group on Reconfigurable Radio Systems, a body of member state authorities, organisations, and individuals whose task is to assist the European Commission with drafting the delegated acts to activate Article 3(3)(i). The FSFE applied to become a member of this committee but was rejected. The concerns that the members of the Expert Group do not sufficiently represent the civil society and the broad range of software users has also been raised during a recent meeting in the European Parliament.

Nevertheless, we are working together with organisations and companies to protect user freedoms on radio devices and keep in touch with members of the expert group. For example, we have shared our expertise for case studies and impact assessments drafted by the group members. We are also looking forward to a public consultation phase to officially present our arguments and improvement suggestions and allow other entities to share their opinion.

All our activities aim to protect Free Software and user rights on current and future radio devices. This is more important than ever since only a few members of the expert group seem to understand the importance of loading software on radio devices for IT security, for example critical updates on hardware which is not or only sporadically maintained by the original vendor. We will continue our efforts to make decision makers understand that Free Software (a.k.a. Open Source Software) is crucial for network security, science, education, and technical innovation. Therefore, broad exceptions in the class definition are necessary.

Conducting such lengthy policy activities requires a lot of resources for non-profit organisations like the FSFE. Please consider helping us by joining as an individual supporter today or a corporate donor to enable our work.

Support FSFE, join the Fellowship
Make a one time donation

Equip yourself for 2018: Get FSFE's new t-shirt celebrating the 100 freedoms of Free Software!

dim, 10/12/2017 - 18:00
Equip yourself for 2018: Get FSFE's new t-shirt celebrating the 100 freedoms of Free Software!

Wear this t-shirt as an icebreaker to explain binary counting and Free Software to your friends—and look good doing it!

The t-shirts are available in geeky green-on-black and in a softer pink or orange. The t-shirts are 100% organic and fair trade.

Check out the new t-shirts in our online shop or at one of our booths.

Support FSFE, join the Fellowship
Make a one time donation

FSFE Yearly Report 2017

mer, 06/12/2017 - 18:00
FSFE Yearly Report 2017

The yearly report of the Free Software Foundation Europe gives you a breakdown in one document of important things we have done and achieved during the last 12 months. Read on to find out about our activities, the campaigns we have run, the events we have visited or organised, the groups we have helped, and what resources we counted on to do it.

Table of content

What we have done in 2017 FSFE's 2017 in numbers The people behind FSFE At the end What we have done in 2017Public Money, Public Code

In September, we launched our Public Money, Public Code campaign. The idea is simple: Software created using taxpayers' money should be available under a free licence for everybody.

To drive our campaign, we have set up a campaign siteand published an open letter that everyone can sign to support our demand. To boost virality and help everyone understand the benefits of public bodies publishing their source code under free licences, we made a video (Webpage / Download / Vimeo / YouTube) explaining the situation. So far it is available in English, German and French, with more languages to come.

This campaign is ongoing and still in its early stages. In fact, we intend to continue it well into 2019 at least, so as to raise awareness among candidates for the elections to the European Parliament. At the moment of writing, we have collected over 14,000 signatures of our open letter. Among the signatories are national representatives and European Parliament Members, and we have received endorsements from over 100 organisations and prominent players in the IT field, including security expert Edward Snowden.

Our goal is to get elected officials to commit to policy and legislations that make publicly funded software free software by default. To that effect, we contacted ~1000 candidates for the German Federal Parliament elections and asked the addressees to "implement legislation requiring that publicly financed software developed for public sector [...] be made publicly available under a Free and Open Source Software licence." from the candidates who contacted us that they support our claim, 19 are now members of parliament. Beside that the whole parliamentary group of the German Green party responded to our campaign in a public letter, stating their support for our demand.

We will keep raising awareness for our demand in upcoming elections. To help us, sign the open letter yourself, spread the word about the campaign and increase our funding.

Save Code Share

A new copyright proposal is currently being discussed by the EU co-legislators. Part of this proposal is Article 13, an item that will hamper our ability to collaborate with each other online. Article 13 mandates that all online hosting service providers must install an upload filter that blocks any works from being uploaded that may constitute a copyright violation and must monitor their users as well as actively seek possible copyright infringements. These fundamentally flawed filtering algorithms will ultimately decide what code developers should be allowed to share. Beside all the problems upload filters come with, there are no known filtering technologies that could accurately and reliably identify whether Free Software code is being shared in accordance with its terms and conditions.

To combat this legislation, we launched a website to Save Code Share in collaboration with Open Forum Europe. We aim to raise awareness of the topic and work to change the proposed legislation. We published a white paper to explain Article 13's impact on free software developers and communities, and an Open Letter that has already been signed by more than 6000 individuals, organisations and companies.

While the European Parliament prepares to vote on its main negotiating position regarding the EU copyright directive proposal in the beginning of 2018, several parliamentary committees have already issued their opinions on Article 13. Together with Open Forum Europe, we put pressure on the vote in Civil Liberties Committee that rejected the use of upload filters when it comes to hosting works online. Now, we have to make sure that the main parliamentary effort takes our concerns into consideration, and rejects Article 13 from its negotiating position with the co-legislators in the EU Council.

REUSE Initiative REUSE Initiativebest practices for conveying copyright and licence information

The website hosts a video (Webpage / Download / Vimeo) that explains the three simple steps involved in making a project REUSE compliant. Developers will also find extra resources. To demonstrate the ease of making a project compliant in practice, we host a number of repositories] that are REUSE compliant.

Furthermore, the FSFE is writing and providing a tool that will help developers make their software REUSE compliant. The goal is to package the tool into the repositories of the most popular GNU/Linux distributions, so that the barriers for adoption are as low as possible.

Do you like what we are doing? Then become a supporter and help us to make a difference in 2018!

10th Legal and Licensing Workshop

Free Software licences are just as important as free code. The Free Software movement would not survive without the legal documents that allow and enforce software to be freely shared and modified. The Legal and Licensing Workshop (LLW) is probably the most important Free Software event you have never heard of. It is aimed at the niche made up by legal experts and professionals that work with the legal system supporting Free Software.

In 2017 we held the workshop's 10th edition in Barcelona. For us this is a landmark because we have managed to get the top legal experts from a wide variety of communities, public institutions and industries travel from all over the world to come together in an event like no other in the Free Software sector. This year's LLW compliance track was all about the tools used to enforce licences and how companies can support them.

Free Software in public administrations was another important topic discussed during the event. The aim was to discover ways of how public administrations could be more transparent and more responsible with the funds when financing the development of software. The ideas legal professionals walked away with will deeply affect society as a whole.

Fiduciary Licence Agreement 2.0

The FSFE acknowledges that the licensing of code has been well served by Free Software licences, but managing rights and content within a project over long periods of time is still a complex issue. To fix this, the FSFE has drafted the Fiduciary Licence Agreement (FLA), a well-balanced contributor agreement which gives the trustee, responsible for managing the rights within a Free Software project, power and responsibility to make sure the contributed software always remains free and open. This ensures that the project, together with all the respective contributors, are protected against any misuse of power by a new copyright holder.

This year we have updated the Fiduciary Licence Agreement (FLA) to version 2.0 which now also covers patents, and has been reworded to be compatible with more jurisdictions and to be easier to read.

We have joined forces with ContributorAgreements.org and integrated the FLA-2.0 into its Copyright Licensing Agreement (CLA) chooser/generator. This makes the use of the FLA easier both for projects and for developers

FLA 2.0 makes it easier to ensure that contributed software always remains free.

European Free Software Policy Meeting

Apart from travelling with our booth to the community's favourite event, the day before the opening of FOSDEM, we hosted the second European Free Software Policy Meeting. We met with Sebastian Raible, parliamentary assistant to Julia Reda, MP of the EU for the German Pirate party; Pierre Damas, Head of Sector, Digital Services at the Directorate General of Information Technologies of the European Commission; Jaana Sahk-Labi from the Estonian Permanent Representation to the EU; Laurent Joubert from the French government; and members of other Free Software advocating organisations.

Together we discussed the progress of the Free and Open Source Software Audit (or FOSSA) programme, some of the Commission's plans for updating its Open Source Software Strategy, and national projects to promote Free Software in public administration and businesses.

Ask your candidates

The FSFE's community participated in the political campaigns during the Dutch general elections, the state of North-Rhine Westphalia as well as the German federal elections.

Our team from the Netherlands developed freedomvote.nl to give voters orientation on internet policies and Free Software. A similar tool was developed by the FSFE together with a "Free Knowledge Coalition" for the German federal elections; the "Digital-o-Mat". This tool made it into the news of multiple national media agencies as well as the public television and attracted tens of thousands of visitors to inform themselves about internet policy topics and Free Software.We also asked political parties in the German elections about their position on Free Software in our "Ask your candidates" campaign-framework.

Do you like what we are doing? Then become a supporter and help us to make a difference in 2018!

New git hosting service: git.fsfe.org

Sharing knowledge and collaboration are two of the core principle in the Free Software society. To encourage both, This year, the FSFE opened a Git hosting service for our supporters with Gitea as a web interface.

By visiting git.fsfe.org, you can share and collaborate on a platform that fully respects your freedoms. Using the graphical web interface, you can open issue reports for bugs or feature requests. git.fsfe.org can host individual projects; complex multi-project repositories for organisations, or act as a mirror for another Git repository hosted elsewhere, like on GitHub or GitLab.

FreedomBox Install Fest in the FSFE Village during SHA 2017.

Investigate Europe

We supported a network of journalists to uncover the degree at which Europe's public infrastructure is dependent on proprietary software from one single provider: Microsoft. Published in 13 newspapers, magazines and online media outlets in nine different languages, the report laid bare how one company has a stranglehold on our public institutions and the negative impact this has on our budgets and freedoms. The FSFE provided the investigative journalists with leads, data and testimonials we had accumulated over years and that served as the backbone to the story.

LiMux: A Lighthouse goes Dark

This year Munich's new mayor, Dieter Reiter, a self-confessed "fan of Microsoft", went out of his way to undermine the work carried out by the administration to migrate away from their proprietary IT framework and pushed for a return to proprietary software on all levels. The FSFE president Matthias Kirschner explained the background to this decision in several talks, for example at the openSUSE Conference 2017 in May, with the intent of spreading insight and awareness to other organisations and Free Software advocates.

Along with The Document Foundation, KDE, and OSBA, we campaigned to keep Free Software in the city of Munich. We reached out to all members of the city council prior to the public hearing and we sent a call for action to our German speaking supporters, asking them to get in contact with politicians. The reaction was phenomenal. During the public hearing, politicians quoted some of our questions, and said that they had never received as much input from citizens and the press before. Unfortunately, all this public pressure did not alter their decision to transition away from LiMux, Microsoft Exchange had been phased in during the talks, and the decision to switch back to proprietary software has been taken.

Taking the "Public Money? Public Code!" campaign out onto the streets of Berlin.

Although this is sad to see, we should use this as an opportunity to evaluate the LiMux case, and see what we -- as the Free Software Community can learn from it -- for future migrations in the public administration. In his talks Matthias raised questions to support an evaluation by the Free Software community.

Do you like what we are doing? Then become a supporter and help us to make a difference in 2018!

FSFE's 2017 in numbers

Having precise data will help you visualise what resources we use to carry out our activities. With that in mind, the next section reduces FSFE's 2017 to figures and numbers. (As a sidenote: A lot of the data in this section, for example the number from our budget, refers to 2016 because it only became available when 2016 was over, that is, in 2017.)

Booth, events and PR

The FSFE has attended no less than 75 events in the last twelve months. The events we attended were of all sizes, from meetups organised by local Free Software groups, to big fairs set up by public institutions and industries, to outdoor non-profit camps. Many take our representatives all over Europe and, in the last year, the FSFE has attended events in 11 countries such as Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Italy, France, Spain, Albania, Austria, Sweden, Portugal, Belgium, Greece and the USA. Apart from speaking and listening to others speak, we also set up our booth at 15 venues.

The FSFE village during SHA Camp 2017 in the Netherlands.

At our booth you can also get stickers, flyers and balloons. These promote Free Software, warn about clouds, advise on using free formats, and so on. In fact, you don't have to visit our booth to get your hands on these goodies: you can ask us yourself for a boxful for your own event at no cost. In the last 12 months we have sent out 233 boxes for the recipient. Since we are talking about rather big boxes, this amounts to literally thousands of stickers, flyers and other goodies.

Budget

In 2017 we got the final data for the 2016 budget and can reveal now that, over the last four years, FSFE's income came to between 350,000 and 450,000 euros, but in 2016 the amount went up to nearly 650,000 euros, which was a nice surprise. That is over a 45% increase with regard to 2015. Most of the growth can be attributed to extraordinary donations from our generous sponsors (up by over 83%), including an inheritance from a person who wants to stay anonymous, but the supporters contributions have also increased and have done so every year, not even flagging in the worst of the economic crisis.

That said, at the FSFE we try to be as a frugal as possible and, although costs went up a bit in 2016, the increase didn't reach 9% with regard to 2015. The biggest costs in 2016 were in our efforts to increase public awareness, where we spent 142,965 euros; our basic infrastructure costs that includes among other things our personell and office costs for management and administration where we spent 130,082 euros and our legal work where we spent 117,336 euros.

FSFE's costs in recent years.

FSFE's revenues in recent years.

Proportionally, the biggest growth in costs happened in the Merchandising department, which grew 16%, from 32,142 euros in 2015 to 37,464 euros in 2016. This is in line with the amount of merchandising we gave and sold to our friends and followers, which increased by 13% from 2015. This is good news, since, as our main aim for merchandising is to spread our message as far and wide as possible, this shows that year after year, the number of people that are made aware of our campaigns and activities grows.

Our best selling garment is without a doubt the black "There is no cloud..." T-shirt. So far in 2017 we have sold 450 of this smart and relevant item of clothing. But clothes are far from the only kind of merchandising the FSFE distributes.

The people behind FSFE

Beyond events and numbers, FSFE is about the people that make up our community. In this sections we would like to introduce you to our comunity and some of our members that too often don't get all the credit they deserve.

Attendees of FSFE community meeting 2017.

Do you like what we are doing? Then become a supporter and help us to make a difference in 2018!

Our community

There are 5 full time employees at the FSFE: Ulrike Sliwinski is our Office Manager and the person you are most likely to talk to if your phone our office; Polina Malaja is the coordinator of the legal team and our Policy Analyst; Erik Albers is our communications and community coordinator; Jonas Öberg is the FSFE's executive director; and, finally, there's Matthias Kirschner who is the president. We also employ 1 part-time employee: Max Mehl, who is our program manager and deputy coordinator of translations. This team is joined by interns for three or more months to work on specific projects and help out in general as well as occasional contractors for specific tasks. This year our interns have been: Olga Gkotsopoulou, Fernando Sanjurjo, Erik da Silva, Jonke Suhr, Carmen Bianca Bakker and Kristi Progri.

The Executive Council is the body that actually executes the wishes of the members. Currently, there are 4 members in the Council: Matthias Kirschner (President), Jonas Öberg (Executive Director), Patrick Ohnewein (Financial Officer) and Heiki Lõhmus (Vice President and Translations Coordinator).

The FSFE's formal members are responsible for planning, budgeting, setting the agenda and electing and recalling of the Executive Council and the Financial Officer. During 2017, we counted on 28 members, including the the 2 prior presidents, Georg Greve and Karsten Gerloff, and the 4 members of the Executive Council.

Then we have our European Core Team, consisting of the formal members plus another 15 individuals from all over Europe, and they are the people that carry out the day-to-day tasks of the organisation on a voluntary or paid basis on core issues and coordinate the many volunteers that support Free Software.

Finally we have the all important supporters. Supporters are sympathisers that have decided to officially support the FSFE by joining our supporter program. During 2017 we surpassed the 1,600 mark and now have supporters in more than 40 countries around the world, including most European countries as well as the Unites States and Australia.

Introducing some of our individualsReinhard Müller

Reinhard is from Lustenau, Vorarlberg, in Austria and has been part of the FSFE for over more than 10 years. Reinhard has always carried out anonymous, often ungrateful tasks that don't get much visibility, but, without which, the FSFE would grind to a halt.

He started out maintaining the FSFE's website, coordinating the translation team and taking care of the Fellowship database. Then, from 2007 to 2017, he took over the financial side as FSFE's official Financial Officer. In that role, Reinhard has done everything related to managing the Foundation's money, from okaying invoices, to filing out our taxes.

However, that hasn't made Reinhard an antisocial hermit, always poring over dusty books with ink-stained fingers. Quite the contrary: if there is something Reinhard enjoys more than columns and columns of figures it is direct contact with people at events. Reinhard loves participating in fairs and tradeshows at the FSFE booth. Next time you are at Linuxtage or FOSDEM, be sure to come by and say hello. You may get lucky and witness Reinhard's legendary T-shirt folding capabilities in action and live. Something worth beholding.

Ulrike Sliwinski

But, talking of booth service and merchandise, if there is one person you can always rely on to get you sweaters and stickers, that is Ulrike. Ulrike joined the FSFE as an office assistant in 2014 on part-time contract. When we realised how much she brought to the job, we quickly asked her to become our full time office manager.

Ulrike, as Reinhard, carries out tasks that are largely invisible to the outside world, but without which the FSFE simply wouldn't be able to run. If you phone the FSFE up for any reason, it will probably be Ulrike who solves your problem. If you ask for one of our boxes of stickers and flyers for you event, it is Ulrike who packs it and sends it off.

Ulrike has been described by some of her colleagues as the "personification of German efficiency" and as someone who will not leave a task alone until it is completed to her entire satisfaction. But Ulrike is also kind, helpful and friendly, making her the perfect host for our office and booth.

André Ockers

One of the FSFE's main missions is to raise awareness among the general public, in companies, in the public sector, and among politicians. Stating the obvious, the first step towards effectively raising awareness, is putting out your messages in the language of your target audience.

That is where people like André come in. André translates most, if not all, FSFE's output into Dutch, and he does so unprompted. André translated more than 80% of FSFE's site into Dutch, and you can expect him to have a translation of every news item or press release we put out within eight hours.

André represents all of those selfless heroes that year in and year out help us reach people of all countries in their native languages.

At the end

We like to send a big big thank you out to our community, all the countless volunteers, supporters and donors who who made the work of FSFE possible in 2017. Your contributions are priceless and we do our best to keep the good work going in 2018.

If you like what we are doing, join the FSFE as a supporter and help us working for Free Software!

Your Free Software Foundation Europe

FSFE in action! (Picture CC-BY-SA 2.0 by Julie Missbutterflies)

Support FSFE, join the Fellowship
Make a one time donation

Dutch government publishes large project as Free Software

mar, 05/12/2017 - 18:00
Dutch government publishes large project as Free Software

The Dutch Ministry of the Interior and Kingdom Relations released the source code and documentation of Basisregistratie Personen (BRP), a 100M€ IT system that registers information about inhabitants within the Netherlands. This comes as a great success for Public Code, and the FSFE applauds the Dutch government's shift to Free Software.

Operation BRP is an IT project by the Dutch government that has been in the works since 2004. It has cost Dutch taxpayers upwards of 100 million Euros and has endured three failed attempts at revival, without anything to show for it. From the outside, it was unclear what exactly was costing taxpayers so much money with very little information to go on. After the plug had been pulled from the project earlier this year in July, the former interior minister agreed to publish the source code under pressure of Parliament, to offer transparency about the failed project. Secretary of state Knops has now gone beyond that promise and released the source code as Free Software (a.k.a. Open Source Software) to the public.

In 2013, when the first smoke signals showed, the former interior minister initially wanted to address concerns about the project by providing limited parts of the source code to a limited amount of people under certain restrictive conditions. The ministry has since made a complete about-face, releasing a snapshot of the (allegedly) full source code and documentation under the terms of the GNU Affero General Public License, with the development history soon to follow.

In a letter to Dutch municipalities earlier in November, secretary of state Knops said that he is convinced of the need of an even playing field for all parties, and that he intends to "let the publication happen under open source terms". He went on to say: "What has been realised in operation BRP has namely been financed with public funds. Software that is built on top of this source code should in turn be available to the public again."

These statements are an echo of the Free Software Foundation Europe's Public Money, Public Code campaign, in which we implore public administrations to release software funded by the public as Free Software available to the citizenry that paid for it.

The echoes of 'Public Money, Public Code' do not stop there. In a letter to the Dutch parliament Wednesday 29 November, the secretary of state writes about the AGPL: "The license terms assure that changes to the source code are also made publicly available. In this way, reuse is further supported. The AGPL offers the best guarantee for this, and besides the GPL (General Public License), sees a lot of use and support in the open source community.

"Publication will happen free of charge so that, in the public interest, an even playing field is created for everyone who wants to reuse this code."

This is big news from the Netherlands and an unprecedented move of transparency by the Dutch government. Following a report to the Ministry of the Interior about publishing government software as Free Software (Open Source Software), it seems that this will happen more often. In it, Free Software is described as making the government more transparent, lowering costs, increasing innovation, forming the foundation for a digital participation society, and increasing the quality of code.

"We applaud the Dutch government for releasing the source code for BRP. We have been asking for this method of working since 2001, and it is good to see that the government is finally taking steps towards Free Software. In the future, we hope that the source code will be released during an earlier stage of development, which we believe in this case would have brought issues to light sooner", says Maurice Verheesen, coordinator FSFE Netherlands.

If you like our campaign "Public Money, Public Code", please become a supporter today to enable our work!

Support FSFE, join the Fellowship
Make a one time donation

Dutch government publishes large project as Free Software

mar, 05/12/2017 - 18:00
Dutch government publishes large project as Free Software

The Dutch Ministry of the Interior and Kingdom Relations released the source code and documentation of Basisregistratie Personen (BRP), a 100M€ IT system that registers information about inhabitants within the Netherlands. This comes as a great success for Public Code, and the FSFE applauds the Dutch government's shift to Free Software.

Operation BRP is an IT project by the Dutch government that has been in the works since 2004. It has cost Dutch taxpayers upwards of 100 million Euros and has endured three failed attempts at revival, without anything to show for it. From the outside, it was unclear what exactly was costing taxpayers so much money with very little information to go on. After the plug had been pulled from the project earlier this year in July, the former interior minister agreed to publish the source code under pressure of Parliament, to offer transparency about the failed project. Secretary of state Knops has now gone beyond that promise and released the source code as Free Software (a.k.a. Open Source Software) to the public.

In 2013, when the first smoke signals showed, the former interior minister initially wanted to address concerns about the project by providing limited parts of the source code to a limited amount of people under certain restrictive conditions. The ministry has since made a complete about-face, releasing a snapshot of the (allegedly) full source code and documentation under the terms of the GNU Affero General Public License, with the development history soon to follow.

In a letter to Dutch municipalities earlier in November, secretary of state Knops said that he is convinced of the need of an even playing field for all parties, and that he intends to "let the publication happen under open source terms". He went on to say: "What has been realised in operation BRP has namely been financed with public funds. Software that is built on top of this source code should in turn be available to the public again."

These statements are an echo of the Free Software Foundation Europe's Public Money, Public Code campaign, in which we implore public administrations to release software funded by the public as Free Software available to the citizenry that paid for it.

The echoes of 'Public Money, Public Code' do not stop there. In a letter to the Dutch parliament Wednesday 29 November, the secretary of state writes about the AGPL: "The license terms assure that changes to the source code are also made publicly available. In this way, reuse is further supported. The AGPL offers the best guarantee for this, and besides the GPL (General Public License), sees a lot of use and support in the open source community.

"Publication will happen free of charge so that, in the public interest, an even playing field is created for everyone who wants to reuse this code."

This is big news from the Netherlands and an unprecedented move of transparency by the Dutch government. Following a report to the Ministry of the Interior about publishing government software as Free Software (Open Source Software), it seems that this will happen more often. In it, Free Software is described as making the government more transparent, lowering costs, increasing innovation, forming the foundation for a digital participation society, and increasing the quality of code.

"We applaud the Dutch government for releasing the source code for BRP. We have been asking for this method of working since 2001, and it is good to see that the government is finally taking steps towards Free Software. In the future, we hope that the source code will be released during an earlier stage of development, which we believe in this case would have brought issues to light sooner", says Maurice Verheesen, coordinator FSFE Netherlands.

If you like our campaign "Public Money, Public Code", please become a supporter today to enable our work!

Support FSFE, join the Fellowship
Make a one time donation

EU Copyright review: The FSFE joins more than 80 organisations asking the EU member states to reject harmful Article 13

mer, 29/11/2017 - 18:00
EU Copyright review: The FSFE joins more than 80 organisations asking the EU member states to reject harmful Article 13

A new copyright proposal is currently discussed by the EU co-legislators. Part of this proposal is Article 13 which can hamper our ability to collaborate with each other online as it imposes new monitoring obligations and installation of arbitrary upload filters on every code hosting and sharing provider. The Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) today raises its voice to save code sharing and joins 80 other organisations in an open letter towards the EU Council.

Free Software development often relies on code hosting platforms to build software together. Current ongoing EU copyright review, and in particular its Article 13 however, could hamper our ability to collaborate online with each other by imposing new obligations on every code hosting and sharing provider to prevent any possible copyright infringement in the form of arbitrary upload filters. In addition, the proposed Article 13 will oblige online platforms to monitor their users and actively seek for possible copyright infringements. However, there are no known filtering technologies that could accurately and reliably identify whether any Free Software is being shared in accordance with its terms and conditions. That means with such an Article 13 as currently proposed in the Council of the European Union (EU Council), software developers’ ability to share and collaborate in the development of source code would be limited.

Together with over 80 organisations, the Free Software Foundation Europe calls the EU member states to acknowledge the danger that Article 13 of the current EU Copyright Directive proposal poses to fundamental rights and freedoms, our economy, our education, our innovation, and our culture. And in order to address the issues Article 13 specifically poses on Free Software, the FSFE together with Open Forum Europe already launched Save Code Share and has published a White Paper to explain how Article 13 endangers our ability to build and share software online. We also ask individuals, organisations and companies to sign our Open Letter addressed to EU legislators to prevent harmful impact of Article 13 on collaborative software development and Free Software.

Support us today so we can make the voice of Free Software developers heard in this policy process.

Background on the policy

The main parliamentary effort in the copyright reform led by the Legal Affairs committee (JURI) will be voted upon in January 2018. However, several other parliamentary committees have issued their opinions on the matter. The most recent one by the European Parliament Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (LIBE), proposes to remove the most harmful provisions from Article 13, which means:

no to upload filters; no to general monitoring obligation to actively seek for any possible copyright infringement on their platforms.

As a result, the LIBE opinion goes in the right direction to make sure that no content, including source code, is taken down because of 'potential' copyright infringement decided by the arbitrary filters. While LIBE's vote did not reject the harmful Article 13 as a whole, it still sends a clear message to the rest of the European Parliament that there is no place for arbitrary code filters when it comes to sharing Free Software online.

While European Parliament's main negotiating position regarding the EU copyright directive is yet to come, the co-legislator EU Council consisting of the EU member states representatives, however, seems to be taking a completely diverging direction, evident from their revised presidency compromise proposal on Article 13. EU Council's compromise proposal reinforces arbitrary removal of works hosted online.

In particular, the EU council proposal reinforces the European Commission's proposal to oblige online platforms, such as code sharing platforms, to prevent any copyright infringement on their platforms. It explicitly mandates to delete and block any content, including code uploads, as soon as the platform is notified of a potential infringement without any meaningful redress mechanism for users to contest that decision. Furthermore, it makes it an explicit responsibility of a platform to make sure that the same content is not being available elsewhere on the same platform, including for example all other projects that might have incorporated the same source code into their software. As a result any code repository or project can be disabled or taken down from online code hosting services at any time.

The EU Council's text is even more inconsistent in its proposals. Not only are platforms obliged to pre-block content, but they have to make sure the "preliminarily blocked content"' is made publicly available so the relevant rightsholders can "enforce their rights with regard to infringing works". The proposal mandates at the same time to both pre-block content upon uploading, and to make the same content publicly available simultaneously, in order to expand the number of possible copyright infringers for rightsholders to go after. Only then, platforms cannot be held liable for actions of their users, while demanding mutually exclusive actions from them. As a result, the EU Council's compromise proposal is introducing more legal uncertainty for online platforms and their users when it comes to sharing works online, including software.

Please become a supporter of the FSFE now, and enable our work!

Support FSFE, join the Fellowship
Make a one time donation

FSFE Newsletter - November 2017

dim, 19/11/2017 - 18:00
FSFE Newsletter - November 2017The FSFE presents modernised Fiduciary Licensing Agreement 2.0

The FSFE's Fiduciary License Agreement (FLA) was initially introduced in 2002, to address the challenge of managing rights and content within a Free Software project over long periods of time. The FLA is a well-balanced contributor agreement, which gives the trustee, responsible for managing the rights within a Free Software project, power and responsibility to make sure the contributed software always remains free and open. This way the project, together with all the respective contributors, is protected against any possible misuse of power by a new copyright holder.

However, the last review of the initial FLA was back in 2007 and we are happy to present an improved and modernised version - FLA-2.0. The biggest improvements are that the FLA-2.0 now also covers patents and enables more practical licensing options directed towards third parties – including referencing an external licensing policy. In addition, the new wording is much improved both in its compatibility with more jurisdictions as well as being easier for everybody to understand and apply.

For FLA-2.0, the FSFE joined forces with ContributorAgreements.org and integrated the FLA-2.0 into its Copyright Licensing Agreement (CLA) chooser/generator, in order to make the use of the FLA easier both for projects and for developers. As a side-effect, all CLA on ContributorAgreements.org have been updated as well, following some of the improvements from the FLA.

General Assembly 2017: new members, new roles and new directions

The members of the Free Software Foundation Europe held their General Assembly on October 15 in Edinburgh, Scotland. The annual meeting is held to discuss strategies for the upcoming year and to set the overall direction of the organisation. Amongst other things, the General Assembly prepared a route to some reforms of the organisational structure and adopted an overall Code of Conduct for the FSFE. Patrick Ohnewein was elected as the new Financial Officer, and six new members joined the association. You can read more details in the official minutes and a summary about the accepted proposals in the corresponding news-item.

Participants of the General Assembly 2017.

Help us grow and make a difference in 2017

What else have we done? Inside and Outside the FSFE The Free Software Foundation Europe released its next version of REUSE practices to make computers understand software copyrights and licenses. The REUSE page now also comes with an explanatory video as well as a set of developer tools and examples which show the REUSE practices in action. The FSFE's Vice President Heiki Lõhmus explains the background about decisions for future changes to FSFE membership and the removal of the Fellowship Representatives during the General Assembly 2017. As in previous editions of the Chaos Communication Camp, the FSFE will set up an assembly during 34C3 for all friends of Free Software and is running a call for participation until November 19. At the beginning of October, 32 European Ministers signed the Tallinn Declaration on eGovernment. The FSFE's policy analyst Polina Malaja writes about FSFE's input and the good process involved in this declaration. The FSFE's Executive Director Jonas Öberg blogs about the steps he took to make cURL REUSE compliant. André Ockers analyses the Dutch coalition agreement on the matter of software and misses any support of Free Software within. Tarin Gamberini evaluates that in the last semester, eight Italian Regions have reduced advertisement of proprietary PDF readers on their website, and that one region has increased its support for Free Software PDF readers. Hannes Hauswedell explains how to use FSFE's Gitea and/or Github to host comments in statically generated blogs and in a privacy-friendly way. The FSFE was present at the Open Source Summit 2017 in Prague, Czech Republic. The FSFE's president Matthias Kirschner gave a talk about "Limux: The Loss of a Lighthouse", and Polina Malaja about "DSM, EIF, RED: Acronyms on the EU Level and Why They Matter for Software Freedom". Jonas Öberg was at the Open Source Strategy Forum in New York to present updates to FSFEs' REUSE practices. The FSFE's country coordinator Germany Björn Schiessle gave a talk about how to avoid digital dependencies at the Fellbacher Weltwochen. The FSFE's country coordinator Italy, Natale Vinto, gave a talk about Public Money? Public Code! at Linux Day Milano to celebrate Linux Day, a national manifestation to discuss about Linux and free software. Do not miss it! Upcoming events with the FSFE

Always find the FSFE's future events listed on our events page.

Contribute to our newsletter

If you would like to share any thoughts, pictures, or news, send them to us. As always, the address is newsletter@fsfe.org. We're looking forward to hearing from you!

Thanks to our community, all the volunteers, supporters and donors who make our work possible. And thanks to our translators, who enable you to read this newsletter in your mother tongue.

Your editor, Erik Albers

Help us grow and make a difference in 2017

Support FSFE, join the Fellowship
Make a one time donation

Welcome supporters (and goodbye smartcard)

mer, 15/11/2017 - 18:00
Welcome supporters (and goodbye smartcard)

Earlier this year, after a public consultation, we took the decision to change the name of our supporter program, the Fellowship of the FSFE, and talk about our supporters by their true name: Supporters. This is an exciting change for us, as it brings our Supporters much closer to the organisation, by making them an integral part of the FSFE. Today, with the change almost complete, we're also taking the opportunity to say goodbye to the Fellowship Smartcard, which has been a part of FSFE life for more than ten years.

These changes do not come easy for us. They have been a part of the FSFE for as long as many of us, and many of us have at times identified as being part of the Fellowship. But what's become apparent is in creating the Fellowship, we also introduced an artificial divide between the FSFE and its supporter program.

In order to have a closer connection to the FSFE, anyone who has felt part of the Fellowship should, and will, be encouraged to think of themselves as a part of the FSFE. Rather than talking about Fellowship Groups, meeting locally to discuss Free Software, we're now talking about FSFE groups. Instead of being a Fellow of the Fellowship program of the FSFE, you will be a Supporter of the FSFE.

A photo of the brand new FSFE supporter patch which all new (and old!) supporters will receive, as an exclusive gift for supporters.

This connection between our supporters, volunteers, and the FSFE is important to us: as a volunteer organisation, anyone who participates in our work, regardless of whether they support us financially or through volunteer contributions, should feel a part of the FSFE. You can choose to do either, or both.

By changing the name we also make clear that a Supporter is someone who contributes to the FSFE, not someone who gets funded by the FSFE (as some have thought it to mean to be a Fellow).

At the same time as we're completing this change, we're also decomissioning our old Fellowship SmartCard, an OpenPGP SmartCard which all our Fellows have traditionally received as a thank you for joining. As we say goodbye to the Fellowship, we also say goodbye to the SmartCard, but for different reasons.

We love the SmartCard, and many of us still use it. But the number of of supporters who actually use it is small. The fact it requires a SmartCard reader, which most people do not have in their computers, further limits its use, especially amongst the non-technical supporters who increasingly join us. Most of the questions we receive about the SmartCard are also about how to use it. Which we would love to help with, but the FSFE is not setup to handle support inquiries related to OpenPGP smartcards.

Since the FSFE is not the only provider of these SmartCards, we've decided to stop offering them to new Supporters. These days, you can get similar SmartCards and other crypto devices from other vendors for those of our Supporters who still want to get a hand on one. Without the SmartCard, the FSFE can focus its ressources better at what is at the core of our mission: Promoting Free Software. It's also a way for us to be more welcoming towards new Supporters: you don't need deep technical skills to become a Supporter.

So with this, it's time for us to say; Goodbye Fellows! Welcome Supporters!

Support FSFE, join the Fellowship
Make a one time donation

Open position as office assistant

lun, 13/11/2017 - 18:00
Open position as office assistant

FSFE is a charity dedicated to keeping the power over technology in your hands. We are working to build freedom in a digital society and operate in a lively environment with volunteers from many countries. We are looking for an assistance supporting the office manager with for instance:

Sending out information material, merchandise-articles and welcome-letters for new supporters Packing and posting packages for FSFE’s information-booths Keeping office and staff’s kitchen tidy

Basic details

Location: FSFE’s office in Berlin (Schönhauser Allee 6/7, 10119 Berlin.

Duration: unlimited, 10 hours per week attending at least twice a week once at beginning of the week and once at the end of the week.

Compensation: 8,84 € per hour as Minijob

Qualifications

Basic knowledge with computers, fluent in English and German.

Application deadline

Please apply by 07.01.2018.

How to apply

Send your application containing a letter of motivation, a CV by e-mail to contact@fsfe.org. Please make sure to write clearly you apply for the office assistant position with reference A-2018. We prefer to receive your documents in PDF format.

Contact persons

If you have any questions about the position or any administrative details in connection with it, you're welcome to contact:

Jonas Öberg about the work of the FSFE, Ulrike Sliwinski for any questions about the work itself.

Both will be reading and responding if you send your question to the contact@fsfe.org address. We look forward to reading your application!

Support FSFE, join the Fellowship
Make a one time donation

2018 internship positions as student interns

lun, 13/11/2017 - 18:00
2018 internship positions as student interns

FSFE is a charity dedicated to empowering users to control technology. We are working to build freedom in digital society. We operate in a lively environment with volunteers from many countries. We are looking for students who can join our team in Berlin for three months or more as a mandatory part of their studies or before graduation.

What we can offer is: A challenging and exciting time with a dynamic NGO working internationally A close-up view of organisational and community processes A chance to take the initiative and put your own ideas into practice The opportunity to meet and work with Free Software advocates across Europe

What you'll do: Contribute to FSFE's ongoing projects, working with one or more of our staff and volunteers. Communicate with contacts from the FSFE community, NGO, industry, and public administrations. Coordinate volunteers and others in the work on various projects. General office tasks. Find your own strengths, and do something you care about.

Be sure to read our pages about internships in general before applying!

Basic details

Location: Berlin, Germany. Please note the FSFE has no ability to help with accommodation or travel, you will need to cover this yourself and arrange this prior to your internship.

Duration: 3 months full time at 35 hours per week, starting as agreed. If the internship is a mandatory part of your education, the internship duration can be longer.

Compensation: This internship is salaried with a basic salary of €450 per month.

Qualifications

You should have some experience or a considerable interest in Free Software. Your field of study doesn't matter, but you should be able to relate it to our work. Traditionally, a lot of interns in the FSFE have a legal or political science background, but we've also had interns working with us with a more technical or other social science background.

Formal requirements

You must be fluent in English and will be required to show that you can legally work in Germany; either by being an EU citizen, or by having a residence and work permit for the duration. The FSFE can not help you in getting either of these documents, but we will accept them if you have them.

The internship must be a formal part of your education, or, if you do the internship on a voluntary basis, you must do the internship before you graduate and in direct connection with your studies.

You must also have a German tax number which you get by registering with the residents registration office (Einwohnermeldeamt) in Germany. This should ideally be done before starting the internship, or at latest on the first days of your internship.

If the internship is a formal part of your education, you also need health insurance which is valid in Germany, for example the European Health Insurance Card.

Application deadline

There is no fixed application deadline for these positions. We accept interns regularly throughout the year, but to facilitate with our planning and to increase the chances of us being able to accommodate you for an internship, you should ideally send your application at least six months before your intended starting date.

How to apply

Send your application containing a letter of motivation, a CV by e-mail to office@fsfe.org. Please make sure to write clearly you apply for the internship position with reference SI-2018. We prefer to receive your documents in PDF format.

Contact persons

If you have any questions about the position or any administrative details in connection with it, you're welcome to contact:

Jonas Öberg about the positions themselves, and the work involved Ulrike Sliwinski for any administrative questions

Both will be reading and responding if you send your question to the contact@fsfe.org address. We look forward to reading your application!

Support FSFE, join the Fellowship
Make a one time donation

32 European ministers call for more Free Software in governmental infrastructure

mer, 08/11/2017 - 18:00
32 European ministers call for more Free Software in governmental infrastructure

On 6 October, 32 European Ministers in charge of eGovernment policy signed the Tallinn Declaration on eGovernment that calls for more collaboration, interoperable solutions, and sharing of good practices throughout public administrations and across borders. Amongst other things, the EU ministers recognised the need to make more use of Free Software solutions and Open Standards when (re)building governmental digital systems with EU funds.

The Tallinn Declaration, lead by the Estonian EU presidency, has been adopted on 6 October 2017. It is a ministerial declaration that marks a new political commitment at European Union (EU) and European Free Trade Area (EFTA) level on priorities to ensure user-centric digital public services for both citizens and businesses cross-border. While having no legislative power, the ministerial declaration marks a political commitment to ensure the digital transformation of public administrations through a set of commonly agreed principles and actions.

The FSFE has previously submitted its input for the aforementioned declaration during the public consultation round, asking for greater inclusion of Free Software in delivering truly inclusive, trustworthy and interoperable digital services to all citizens and businesses across the EU.

The adopted Tallinn Declaration proves to be a forward-looking document that acknowledges the importance of Free Software in order to ensure the principle of 'interoperability by default', and expresses the will of all signed EU countries to:

"make more use of open source solutions and/or open standards when (re)building ICT systems and solutions (among else, to avoid vendor lock-ins)[...]"

Additionally, the signatories call upon the European Commission to:

"consider strengthening the requirements for use of open source solutions and standards when (re)building of ICT systems and solutions takes place with EU funding, including by an appropriate open licence policy – by 2020."

The last point is especially noteworthy, as it explicitly calls for the European Commission to make use of Free Software and Open Standards in building their ICT infrastructure with EU funds, which is in line with our "Public Money, Public Code" campaign that is targeted at the demand for all publicly financed software developed for the public sector to be publicly made available under Free Software licences.

What's next?

The Tallinn Declaration sets several deadlines for its implementation in the next few years: with the annual presentation on the progress of implementation of the declaration in the respective countries across the EU and EFTA through the eGovernment Action Plan Steering Board. The signatories also called upon the Austrian Presidency of the Council of the EU to evaluate the implementation of the Tallinn Declaration in autumn 2018.

"The Declaration expresses the political will of the EU and EFTA countries to digitise their governments in the most user-friendly and efficient way. The fact that it explicitly recognises the role of Free Software and Open Standards for a trustworthy, transparent and open eGovernment on a high level, along with a demand for strengthened reuse of ICT solutions based on Free Software in the EU public sector, is a valuable step forward to establishing a "Public Money, Public Code" reality across Europe", says Polina Malaja, the FSFE's policy analyst.

Support FSFE, join the Fellowship
Make a one time donation

FSFE makes copyrights computer readable

mar, 07/11/2017 - 18:00
FSFE makes copyrights computer readable

The Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) is proud to release its next version of our REUSE practices designed to make computers understand software copyrights and licenses.

The REUSE practices help software developers make simple additions to license headers which make it easier for a computer to determine what license applies to the various parts of a programs source code. By following the REUSE practices, software developers can ensure their intent to license software under a particular license is understood and more readily adhered to.

Together with the updated practices, which mostly clarify and make explicit some points, the FSFE is also releasing a set of developer tools and examples which show the REUSE practices in action. Three example repositories, together with an example walkthrough of the process used to make the cURL project REUSE compliant, are complemented with a simple tool to validate whether a program is REUSE compliant.

With our REUSE initiative, we hope to inspire software developers to think about writing copyright and license information -- the metadata of software -- in ways which make them easier to parse programmatically.

says Jonas Öberg, Executive Director of the FSFE.

The new REUSE practices and related documentation and examples can be found on: https://reuse.software.

Support FSFE, join the Fellowship
Make a one time donation

General Assembly 2017: new members, new roles and new directions

lun, 06/11/2017 - 18:00
General Assembly 2017: new members, new roles and new directions

The members of the Free Software Foundation Europe held their General Assembly on October 15 in Edinburgh, Scotland. The annual meeting is held to discuss strategies for the upcoming year and set the course for the overall direction of the organisation. Amongst other things an overall Code of Conduct for the FSFE was adopted, Patrick Ohnewein was elected as the new Financial Officer, and six new members joined the association.

After years of dedicated work Reinhard Müller stepped down from his role as the FSFE's Financial Officer. The organisation thanked him for his long time contributions to the FSFE and is happy about his ongoing support as a valued member of the FSFE's financial team. Reinhard was replaced in the role of Financial Officer by Patrick Ohnewein who was elected for office during the 2017-2019 term. The FSFE's incumbent president Matthias Kirschner and vice president Heiki Lõhmus were both re-elected for their roles during the 2017-2019 term.

From left to right: Nikos Roussos, Mirko Böhm, Reinhard Müller, Heiki Löhmus, Polina Malaja, Max Mehl, Matthias Kirschner, Amandine "Cryptie", Björn Schiessle, Jonas Öberg, Patrick Ohnewein. Not in the photo is Albert Dengg who also participated in the assembly.

Aside from the official elections, the General Assembly also took some important decisions for the future of the FSFE. You can read the full official minutes online and a summary about the accepted proposals hereafter

On directions: To increase diversity and to make sure the FSFE is an organisation people like to get involved in, a Code of Conduct for all FSFE events, online and offline was adopted. The executive was asked to make a proposal for the 2018 budget for identifying strategies for increased diversity in the FSFE community and the FSFE membership, by having a budget for counseling on diversity and a time budget for staff to get involved in this issue. The FSFE applies as a member of European Digital Rights (EDRi). The FSFE should create an explicit financial reserve ("Rücklage") of 100.000 Euro. (Due to a generous heritage towards the FSFE, the association received an extraordinary surplus in 2016. These circumstances allow a financial reserve that is otherwise not allowed for a charitable organisation.) On structure

Several proposals were received and discussed prior to the assembly, two of which were adopted and agreed to by the members. The proposals instruct the organisation's executive to prepare necessary changes to the constitution that reform the organisational structure. Specifically, it was agreed that a constitutional change to remove the Fellowship seats should be prepared. These Fellowship seats were introduced to give the FSFE’s sustaining donors access to the General Assembly. But instead, we like to bring in more of our active volunteers into the FSFE's General Assembly. Means the Fellowship seats will be implicitly replaced with a structure and procedures to accommodate a wider base of active members and a separation between membership and the governing organs (introducing a board of directors or enlarging the executive council, or similar). The exact details of those changes should be prepared and proposed for adoption by the members at the 2018 general assembly.

On membership: Pablo Machón and Martin Gollowitzer withdrew their membership. The Chair thanked them for many years of active work for the organisation. Amandine "Cryptie", Polina Malaja, Ulrike Sliwinski, Jan-Christoph Borchardt, Max Mehl and Erik Albers have been granted membership.

Twelve out of 28 members attended the assembly in 2017. Eleven members were absent but represented by members present by delegating their votes.

Support FSFE, join the Fellowship
Make a one time donation

Call for sessions at the FSFE assembly during 34C3

lun, 23/10/2017 - 19:00
Call for sessions at the FSFE assembly during 34C3

From December 27 to 30, the 34th Chaos Communication Congress will be held in Leipzig. As in recent years, the FSFE is happy to host an assembly that includes an information booth and a meeting point for all Free Software enthusiasts and our friends to come together. We offer a stage and look for interesting self-organised sessions for our community. This is the corresponding call for participation.

For our sessions at the FSFE assembly, we are looking for inspiring talks, hands-on workshops, community/developer/strategy meetings or any other public, informative or collaborative activities. Topics can be anything that is about or related to Free Software. We welcome technical sessions but we encourage to give non-technical talks that address philosophical, economical or other aspects of/about Free Software. We also enjoy sessions about related subjects that have a clear connection to Free Software, for example privacy, data protection, sustainability and similar topics. Finally, we welcome all backgrounds – from your private project to global community projects.

Do you have something different in mind? For our friends, it is also possible to have informal meetings, announcements or other activities at our assembly. In this case, get in touch and we will see what we can do.

Crowded room while Hannes Hauswedell is giving a session about secure mobile messengers during 33C3

Formalities

If you are interested in hosting a session at the FSFE assembly, please apply no later than

** Sunday, November 19, 18:00 UTC **

by sending an email to Erik Albers (OpenPGP) with the subject “Session at 34C3” and use the following template:

Title: name of your session Description: description of your session Type: talk / discussion / meeting / workshop … Tags: put useful tags here Link: (if there is a helpful link) Expected number of participants: 20 or less / up to 40 / up to 100 About yourself: some words about you/your biography

You will be informed latest on Monday, November 27, if your session is accepted.

Good to know If your session is accepted we happily take care of its proper organisation, advertising and everything else that needs to be done. You are then welcome to simply come and give/host your session. But please note that this is neither a guarantee of a ticket, nor do we take care of your ticket! Check the CCC-announcements and get yourself a ticket in time. You do not need to be a supporter of the FSFE to host a session. On the contrary, we welcome external guests. Please share this call with your friends or your favourite mailing list. Related information: For your inspiration to this call, see our sessions during 33C3 and 32C3. With the CCC moving from Hamburg to Leipzig, self-organized sessions will not longer happen in community rooms but on several stages that are organised by adjacent and clustering assemblies. Details still need to be sorted out, but we will form a cluster with other freedom fighting NGOs and our friends from European Digital Rights. Find some more information about this in Erik Albers' blog post.

Support FSFE, join the Fellowship
Make a one time donation

FSFE Lettre d'information - Octobre 2017

dim, 22/10/2017 - 19:00
FSFE Lettre d'information - Octobre 2017Dites à l'UE de préserver le partage du code dans le débat en cours sur les droits d’auteur !

L'UE est en train de réviser sa réglementation du droit d'auteur afin qu'elle soit mieux adaptée à l'ère numérique moderne dans sa proposition de directive européenne sur le droit d’auteur dans le marché unique numérique. Au lieu de tenir compte des réalités dans la façon dont les différents contenus en ligne sont partagés, l'état actuel de la proposition de Directive européenne sur le droit d'auteur et en particulier son article 13 consacré aux hébergeurs de contenu en ligne menacent menacenotre capacité à accéder à des dépôts (/répertoires) de code source en ligne. Les nouvelles règles inscrites dans l'article 13 visent à introduire de nouvelles obligations pour les plateformes d’hébergement de code source dans le but d'empêcher une possible violation du droit d'auteur, sinon ces plateformes pourraient être tenues directement responsables de l’activité de ses utilisateurs. L'article 13 impose ainsi l'utilisation de filtres onéreux lors de la mise en ligne de contenu afin d’identifier du code présumé contrevenant. Le problème avec une telle exigence, c'est qu'il n'existe aucun filtre automatique connu à ce jour qui puisse identifier rigoureusement si du code est partagé de manière adéquate sans enfreindre une licence de Logiciel Libre. De plus, l'article 13 impose une obligation de surveillance considérable aux plateformes d’hébergement de code afin de chercher activement des activités illicites de la part des utilisateurs. De ce point de vue, l'état actuel de l'article 13 considère chaque utilisateur d'une plateforme d’hébergement de code comme un potentiel auteur d'infractions du droit d'auteur, dont le contenu, y compris la totalité d'un dépôt peut être mis hors-ligne ou bien interdit d'être mis en ligne sur la plateforme à n'importe quel moment.Si le code devient aussi facilement non publiable, cela entraverait sévèrement tous les autres logiciels de se construire par-dessus.

Pour plus d'information sur la manière dont l'article 13 menace notre possibilité de créer des logiciels en ligne, visitez Save Code Share (Préservez le partage du code) et lisez notre Livre blanc.

In the online version you find a picture here: ] [Stand FSFE à la conférence FrOSCon de l'Université des Sciences Appliquées Bonn-Rhein-Sieg, Allemagne] [ https://fsfe.org/news/nl/nl-201710 ]

Aidez-nous à grandir et à faire la différence en 2017

Qu'avons-nous fait d'autre ? À l'intérieur ou à l'extérieur de la FSFE Jusqu'à présent, le succès de notre campagne Argent public ? Code public ! a été extraordinaire. Au moment de vous écrire, nous avons récolté plus de 13.000 signataires de la lettre ouverte et la campagne a reçu le soutien de plus de 80 organisations. La campagne a reçu une attention accrue grâce à une importante couverture de presse mais aussi grâce aux nombreuses figures éminentes, développeurs, artistes, entrepreneurs ainsi qu’aux hommes et femmes politiques qui ont rejoint notre demande pour que dès qu'un logiciel ait été financé par de l'argent public, le code soit lui aussi public. Si vous ne l'avez pas encore fait, rejoignez-nous et signez la lettre ouverte. Jonas Öberg, le directeur exécutif de la FSFE a blogué à propos des mises à jour et des modèles pour la campagne REUSE de la FSFE. Dans sa note de blog, il présente trois différents répertoires Git où chacun est conforme à REUSE et illustre différents éléments des usages recommandés par REUSE. Kristi Progri, assistante de projet pour la FSFE a écrit une note à propos du processus actuel de la FSFE dans la définition de son identité et comment participer au processus d'entretiens . Polina Malaja, notre analyste politique et coordinatrice juridique a donné une conférence au CopyCamp de Varsovie, Pologne, à propos de l'état actuel de la directive européenne des droits d'auteur, de son incidence pour le développement collaboratif de logiciels et de notre campagne Save Code Share (Préservez le partage du code). Carmen Bakker et Erik Da Silva, nos actuels stagiaire à la FSFE, ont donné une conférence pendant le CopyCamp de Varsovie à propos de la campagne Argent Public ? Code Public ! Vous trouverez un petit compte-rendu ainsi qu'une vidéo sur le blog de Carmen. Erik Albers, gestionnaire des programmes et coordonnateur communautaire de la FSFE a donné la conférence Les Logiciels Libres en campagne avant les élections) à la Journée Linux de Kiel (Allemagne). Polina Malaja a fait une présentation lors de la journée Software Freedom Day (Journée de la Liberté Logicielle) à propos de la campagne Argent Public ? Code Public ! à la c-base de Berlin. Lors de la Semaine numérique de Kiel, Erik Albers a parlé de Argent Public ? Code Public ! et de sa pertinence dans l'actuel accord electoral en Schleswig-Holstein. À ne pas manquer  ! Événements à venir avec la FSFE

Nous sommes en train de préparer le premier rendez-vous communautaire de la FSFE. Il prendra place les 25 et 26 novembre à Berlin. Nous invitons tous les membres actifs et toutes les personnes qui souhaiteraient à nouveau s'engager afin de se retrouver et de collaborer. Les places sont limitées à cause des restrictions physiques.Si vous souhaitez participer, vous pouvez lire tous les détails sur la page wiki dédiée.

Agissez

Dites aux membre du Parlement Européen et au Conseil Européen de protéger le dévelopement collaboratif du Logiciel Libre en ligne et tout particulièrement le partage de Logiciel Libre en signant la Lettre Ouverte en tant qu'individu et/ou en tant qu'organisation Save Code Share (Préserver le partage du code)  ! Faites passer le mot à propos des dangers de l'état actuel de la Directive euorpéenne sur les droits d'auteur dans vos réseaux #savecodeshare. Dites aux hommes et femmes politique de l'UE qu'il n'y a pas de place pour les filtres automatiques lorsqu'il s'agit de partager du code en tant que Logiciel Libre !

Aidez-nous à améliorer notre lettre d'information

Si vous souhaitez partager vos idées, des illustrations ou des nouvelles, vous pouvez nous les soumettre. Comme toujours, l'adresse est newsletter@fsfe.org. Nous nous réjouissons d'avoir de vos nouvelles !

Merci à notre communauté, à tous les bénévoles, soutiens et donateurs qui rendent notre travail possible. Merci à nos groupes de traductions grâce à qui vous pouvez lire ce bulletin d'information dans votre langue maternelle.

Vos éditeurs, Polina Malaja et Erik Albers

Aidez-nous à grandir et à faire la différence en 2017

Support FSFE, join the Fellowship
Make a one time donation

FSFE presents modernised Fiduciary Licensing Agreement 2.0

jeu, 12/10/2017 - 19:00
FSFE presents modernised Fiduciary Licensing Agreement 2.0

The FSFE and ContributorAgreements.org proudly present the revised and updated Fiduciary Licence Agreement 2.0 (FLA-2.0) - a next-generation contributor agreement that makes sure the contributed software always remains Free Software.

The FSFE acknowledges that the licensing of code has been well served by Free Software licences such as the GPL, Apache, BSD, and MPL families. However, managing rights and content within a project over long periods of time is still a complex issue.

To fix this the FSFE with the help of knowledgeable experts drafted the Fiduciary Licence Agreement (FLA) as early as 2002. The FLA is a well-balanced contributor agreement, which gives the trustee, responsible for managing the rights within a Free Software project, power and responsibility to make sure the contributed software always remains free and open. This way the project, together with all the respective contributors, are protected against any misuse of power by a new copyright holder.

The way this works under the FLA is that developers assign an exclusive licence to the trustee (usually a foundation or company, under whose auspices the software lies) and in return they receive a non-exclusive licence of the same extent, as well as a legally binding promise that the code they contributed will forever remain Free Software.

In the last decade, the world of IT has changed quite a bit and, apart from copyright, patents and trade marks have become a serious concern for Free Software projects.

With the last review in 2007, the FLA (version 1.2) was long due an update. So we are delighted to finally unveil the FLA-2.0 – a much improved and modernised version.

The biggest improvements are that the FLA-2.0 now also covers patents and enables more practical licensing options directed towards third parties – including referencing to an external licensing policy. In addition, the new wording is much improved both in its compatibility with more jurisdictions as well as being easier for everybody to understand and apply.

Furthermore, we have joined forces with ContributorAgreements.org and integrated the FLA-2.0 into its Copyright Licensing Agreement (CLA) chooser/generator, in order to make the use of the FLA easier both for projects and for developers. As a side-effect, all CLA on ContributorAgreements.org have been updated as well, following some of the improvements from the FLA.

As is often in FOSS and life, we are merely standing on the shoulders of giants. The current update – while itself taking several industrious years of research and analysis, culminating in a master's thesis – would not have been possible without the authors of the original FLA, as well as a great deal of legal research which was the basis for the ContributorAgreements.org. The sheer community knowledge aggregated in the FLA-2.0 makes me confident that it is more relevant and useful today as ever before.

says Matija Šuklje, former FSFE's Legal Coordinator and the main driving force behind the FLA update.

The revised FLA-2.0 is an outcome of a longstanding and scrupulous collaboration between the FSFE and ContributorAgreements.org. We are pleased to see that collaboration to bear fruits in the shape of the FLA-2.0. We hope that the new FLA will provide developers and Free Software projects with more clarity, while retaining the spirit of the original version.

says Polina Malaja, the FSFE’s Legal Coordinator

We are thrilled to partner with FSFE and to see the new FLA-2.0 go live hand in hand with a new version of our set of standardised contributor agreements. FSFE's passion and especially Matija Šuklje's dedication to modernising the FLA has enabled us to further revise and refine our agreement chooser and we are especially delighted to offer the new FLA-2.0 as one possible agreement to be chosen out different options available at contributoragreements.org

says Catharina Maracke, Team Lead at ContributorAgreements.org

KDE e.V. is the biggest user of the FLA and we are delighted to see this new version released. As a global project we especially appreciate the effort to make it applicable to more jurisdictions and easier to understand for our contributors.

says Lydia Pintscher, President of KDE e.V.

Support FSFE, join the Fellowship
Make a one time donation

EU Copyright Review: Tell Legislators to Save Code Share

mer, 04/10/2017 - 19:00
EU Copyright Review: Tell Legislators to Save Code Share

The FSFE, together with Open Forum Europe, asks the EU policymakers to Save Code Share in the current on-going EU Copyright review. Today we ask you to support our newest campaign Save Code Share by signing an Open Letter addressed to the EU policymakers.In this letter we request EU legislators to preserve the ability to collaboratively build software online in current EU Copyright Directive proposal.

If the proposed changes targeted at online platforms are implemented, this would force online code sharing repositories to use filters that monitor and preemptively take down any content that could potentially infringe copyright, including entire code repositories. Otherwise, platforms will be held directly liable for any alleged copyright infringement found in the source code hosted on their services. Such shift in the liability regime from rightholders to platforms would durably harm the Free Software ecosystem which often relies on code hosting platforms to build software together, as it will result in more arbitrary code removal on code hosting platforms.

How does Article 13 harm Free Software?

A lot of the software used in everyday life contains Free Software components. Free Software is popular because it can be shared under terms that allow and encourage using it for any purpose, studying its source code, sharing it with others, and customising it according to one's needs. Source code is often shared through online code hosting platforms that act as a main access point for collaboration online.

The current legislative negotiations over the EU "Copyright Reform" package, and particularly Article 13, indicate that we risk seeing the imposition of far-reaching rules for every online platform which allows their users to upload large amounts of content, including code hosting platforms. Specifically, the proposals embodied in the draft of Article 13 threaten code hosting platforms by imposing new obligations on them. Namely, code hosting platforms will be legally required to use costly (but ultimately fundamentally flawed) filtering technologies. There are no known filtering technologies that could accurately and reliably identify whether any Free Software is being shared in accordance with its legal terms and conditions. In addition, the proposed Article 13 will oblige online platforms to monitor their users and actively seek for possible copyright infringements.

Consequently, Article 13, as currently proposed, would shift the responsibility for protecting allegedly infringed rights from rightholders to platforms in a way that disproportionately harms the sector that is a cornerstone of innovation.

Article 13 would restrict the freedom of developers to choose freely among a variety of software components and tools, as these tools and components will no longer be available online. In a domino effect, Free Software projects could no longer rely upon precedent projects and tools due to an arbitrary upload filter that can prevent code being hosted online. As a consequence, software will become less reliable, and digital infrastructure less resilient for everybody.

Take Action Now

Please sign and share the Open Letter both on behalf of an organisation, and as an individual. The Open Letter together with your signatures will be handed over to the Members of the European Parliament and the EU Council. For more information on how proposed Article 13 would harm fundamental rights and negatively impact collaborative software development and Free Software, please read our White Paper.

Support FSFE, join the Fellowship
Make a one time donation

FSFE Newsletter - September 2017

dim, 17/09/2017 - 19:00
FSFE Newsletter - September 2017Tell EU to Save Code Share in the current EU Copyright debate!

EU is currently revising its copyright rules for them to be more adapted for modern digital age in its proposal for the EU Copyright Directive in the Digital Single Market. Instead of recognising the realities of how different content is being shared online, the current EU Copyright Directive proposal, and in particular its Article 13 targeted at online hosting providers, threatens our ability to access public code repositories and share code online. The new rules enshrined in Article 13 intend to introduce new obligations for code hosting platforms in order to prevent any possible copyright infringement, otherwise platforms will end up being directly liable for their users' activity. Article 13, thus, imposes the use of costly upload filters in order to identify allegedly infringing code. The problem with such requirement is that there are no known automated filters that can accurately identify whether the code is shared adequately and without breaching a respective Free Software licence. In addition, Article 13 imposes a far-reaching monitoring obligation on code hosting platforms to actively seek for infringing activity by their users. In scope, proposed Article 13 treat every user of code hosting platform a potential copyright infringer whose content, including the whole code repositories, may be taken down or prevented to be uploaded to the platform at any time. If code gets so easily "unpublished", this can severely hamper all the other software built on top of that.

For more information on how Article 13 poses a threat to the ability to build software online, please visit Save Code Share and read our White Paper.

[ In the online version you find a picture here: ] [ FSFE booth at FrOSCon in the University of Applied Sciences Bonn-Rhein-Sieg, Germany ] [ https://fsfe.org/news/nl/nl-201710 ]

Help us grow and make a difference in 2017

What else have we done? Inside and Outside the FSFE Success of our Public Money? Public Code! campaign so far has been overwhelming. In the time of writing, we are more then 12.500 individual subscribers of the open letter and the campaign is backed by the support of more than 80 organisations. The campaign gained attention by a huge press coverage and also many prominent people, developers, artists, CEOs and politicians have joined our demand that whenever software is financed by public money it should be public code as well. If you have not done so already, join us now and sign the open letter. Jonas Öberg, the FSFE Executive Director, blogged about updates and templates to the FSFE's REUSE campaign. In his blogpost he presents three different Git repositories, each of which is REUSE compliant, and which demonstrate different parts of recommended REUSE practices. Kristi Progri, project assistant for the FSFE, blogged about our ongoing identity process and how to become part of the involved interview process. Polina Malaja, our policy analyst and legal coordinator, gave a talk at CopyCamp in Warsaw, Poland, about implications of the current EU Copyright Directive proposal for collaborative software environment and our campaign Save Code Share. Carmen Bakker and Erik Da Silva, current interns at the FSFE, were giving a talk during Copycamp in Warsaw about our campaign Public Money Public Code. Find a short report and a video on Carmen's blog Erik Albers, program manager and community coordinator of the FSFE, gave a talk about Free Software campaigning in the forefront of elections at the Kieler Linuxtage, Germany. On Software Freedom Day, Polina Malaja gave a talk about Public Money Public Code in the c-base, Berlin. During the Digitale Woche Kiel, Erik Albers gave a talk about Public Money Public Code and how it helps with the current coalition agreement in Schleswig-Holstein. Do not miss it! Upcoming events with the FSFE

We are preparing the first-of-its-kind FSFE community meeting. It will take place on November 25 & 26 in Berlin. We therefore invite all active community members and those who like to become active again, to come together and collaborate. Seats are limited due to physical restrictions. If you like to participate read all details on the dedicated wiki-page.

Get Active

Tell the Members of the European Parliament and the EU Council to secure collaborative software development online, and in particularly sharing Free Software, by signing the [Open Letter] both as individual and/or organisation on Save Code Share! Please spread the word about negative implications of the current EU Copyright Directive proposal within your networks #savecodeshare . Tell EU policy makers that there is no place for upload filters when it comes to sharing code as Free Software!

Contribute to our newsletter

If you would like to share any thoughts, pictures, or news, send them to us. As always, the address is newsletter@fsfe.org. We're looking forward to hearing from you!

Thanks to our community, all the volunteers, supporters and donors who make our work possible. And thanks to our translators, who enable you to read this newsletter in your mother tongue.

Your editors, Polina Malaja and Erik Albers

Help us grow and make a difference in 2017

Support FSFE, join the Fellowship
Make a one time donation

FSFE Lettre d'information - Septembre 2017

dim, 17/09/2017 - 19:00
FSFE Lettre d'information - Septembre 2017Argent Public ? Code Public !

Les services numériques proposés et utilisés par nos administrations publiques font partie des infrastructures vitales des nations démocratiques du 21ème siècle. Néanmoins, à cause de licences de logiciels restrictives, de nombreuses entités publiques n'ont pas un contrôle total sur leur infrastructure numérique. Même si la publication d'un logiciel financé par de l'argent public sous une licence libre engendre de nombreux bénéfices pour les gouvernements et la société civile, les responsables politiques sont réticents à améliorer la législation à ce sujet. Il est temps que cela change. À la FSFE, nous voulons une législation qui exige que les logiciels développés pour le secteur public et financés par de l'argent public soient mis à disposition sous une licence libre et open source. Si c'est de l'argent public, cela doit aussi être du code public !

Pour appuyer notre demande, la FSFE a lancé une nouvelle campagne la semaine dernière : "Public Money Public Code" (Argent Public Code Public. La campagne explique avec une courte vidéo et une lettre ouverte à signer les avantages de publier sous licence libre les logiciels financés par les fonds publics. La campagne et la lettre ouverte seront utilisées au cours des prochains mois et jusqu'aux élections du Parlement européen qui auront lieu en 2019, pour mettre en évidence les bons et les mauvais exemples de développement de logiciels financés par des fonds publics ainsi que leur réutilisation potentielle.

Débuté avec succès, le lancement de la campagne a été relayé par de nombreux sites Web et magazines d'information en Europe. Au moment d'écrire ces lignes, la Lettre Ouverte a déjà été signée par plus de 35 organisations et par plus de 5000 personnes. Plusieurs politiciens et d'autres personnalités publiques ont ouvertement annoncé leur soutien à la campagne, dont Edward Snowden, président de la Fondation Liberté de la presse :

"L'argent public ne devrait pas servir à écrire des logiciels que le public ne sera pas autorisé à corriger. Signez la lettre, sauvez le monde :https://publiccode.eu/#action #PublicCode"

Signez la lettre ouverte et soutenez également un code public  : https://publiccode.eu/#action

La FSFE publie les bonnes pratiques en matière de licences logicielles

Si vous voulez que d'autres puissent utiliser votre code, vous devez inclure une licence, et le faire de la meilleure manière possible afin qu'elle puisse être comprise par les humains et les ordinateurs. Malheureusement, une infinité de logiciels et d'innombrables extraits de codes sont disponibles en accès libre mais sans toujours une licence appropriée. Une des raisons étant que le fait d'inclure une licence à un logiciel de manière cohérente et compréhensible peut parfois représenter un vrai défi. Faire comprendre votre licence à un ordinateur peut s'avérer encore plus difficile.

C'est pour cette raison que la FSFE a travaillé à rendre la gestion des droits d'auteur et des licences de Logiciel Libre plus facile. Notre Guide des bonnes pratiques pour l'utilisation de licences pour les logiciels («  Software Licensing Best Practices guide   ») va vous aider à inclure une licence et une note de droit d'auteur dans votre logiciel. Et alors que l'on est toujours en train d'évaluer ces bonnes pratiques, vous trouverez déjà à l'adresse https://reuse.software/ quelques mesures à prendre pour rendre la licence et les droits d'auteur plus facile à utiliser.

Dans la version en ligne vous trouverez une photo ici : Le village FSFE durant le SHA Camp 2017 au Pays-Bas. https://fsfe.org/news/nl/nl-201709

Aidez nous à grandir et à faire la différence en 2017.

Qu'avons-nous fait d'autres ? A l'intérieur ou à l'extérieur de la FSFE Les propositions de la Directive Européenne des droits d'auteurs restreignent les droits des développeurs et des utilisateurs d'internet, créant des barrières au développement de code source. En coopération avec l' Open Forum Europe, la FSFE a écrit un livre blanc afin d'aider chaque personne à percevoir la totalité des enjeux du point de vue du développeur de logiciels. Nous allons lancer une campagne dans le cours du mois, mais vous pouvez déjà aider à sensibiliser l'opinion en partageant largement le lien vers Save Code Share. Le directeur exécutif de la FSFE, Jonas Öberg, a publié un billet sur son blog à propos du budget annuel de la FSFE, comment nos finances sont structurées et où passe l'argent. La «  Koalition Freies Wissen » (Coalition du Savoir Libre) a créé le « Digital-O-Mat » , un outil en ligne pour informer les électeurs sur les élections fédérales allemandes du 24 septembre 2017. Le Digital-O-Mat (allemand) souligne les différentes positions des partis à propos des sujets qui sont importants pour la politique et la structure d'internet, comme le Logiciel Libre, et aident les électeurs à trouver le parti qui leur convient le mieux pour l'élection du parlement allemand. L'équipe Allemagne de la FSFE a envoyé le questionnaire «Interrogez vos candidats» aux participants des partis du Bundestagswahl (les élections fédérales allemande) et a publié et analysé leurs réponses.. (Allemand) L'équipe Pays-Bas de la FSFE était présente avec un village au SHA Camp, un camp hacker sans but lucratif au Pays-Bas. Pendant les cinq jours, ce village a offert un espace de discussions, de rencontres, de karaoké, et un abri. La FSFE avait son propre village qui a proposé de multiples sessions auto-gérées, ainsi qu'une chorale de chant "Logiciel Libre" et un festival d'installation de FreedomBox. L'équipe Grecque de la FSFE a soutenu la première édition du Re:publica in Thessaloniki, une conférence sur la culture numérique. Le groupe de la FSFE de Mayence/Rhin (« Rhein/Main ») était présent avec un stand à Froscon, une conférence sur le Logiciel Libre à l'Université de Sciences appliquées Bonn-Rhein-Sieg, en Allemagne. Le président de la FSFE Matthias Kirschner a également fait une présentation intitulée « Limux: das Ende eines Leuchtturm-Projekts!? »(Limux: la fin d'un projet phare!?). (allemand) En avril dernier, le Digital Society Institute a accueilli un colloque pour analyser le thème « Est-ce que les Logiciels Libres sont sûrs ? Les annales de la sécurité des Logiciels libres et open sourcet ». La rencontre comprenait une intervention de Matthias Kirschner qui est maintenant disponible en anglais et en allemand et inclut des recommandations pour le secteur privé et public. Nous sommes ravi d’accueillir 3 nouveaux stagiaires : Carmen Bianca Bakker, Kristi Progri et Erik Da Silva. Si vous êtes intéressé par un stage avec nous, trouvez plus d'informations sur nos pages. Nous avons un nouvel article dans la boutique en ligne de la FSFE : une bavette rose non-binaire avec le slogan « I am a fork » (je suis un embranchement) cousue sur le bavoir. Équitable et biologique.

The FSFE village during SHA Camp 2017 in the Netherlands.

À ne pas manquer  ! Événements à venir avec la FSFE

Les 28 et 29 septembre, se tiendra le CopyCamp à Varsovie. CopyCamp est une conférence qui vise à interroger comment les droits exclusifs immatériels modifient la culture, l'éducation, la science et les Logiciels Libres. Mathias Kirschner parlera de «  Limux: la perte d'un projet phare   » et notre analyste politique Polina Malaja présentera « La réforme européenne des droits de reproduction et son incidence pour le développement collaboratif de logiciel ». Il n'y a pas de prix d'entrée, mais il est demandé aux personnes qui souhaitent participer de bien vouloir s’inscrire . Grâce à la fondation pour la Coopération Germano-Polonaise, il y a des bourses de voyage disponibles pour les personnes qui résident en Allemagne, offertes par le Ministères des affaires étrangères allemand

Agissez

Venez voir notre page «  Public Money Public Code  » et la vidéo-PMPC et partagez-les avec vos amis, collègues et vos listes de diffusion préférées. Demandez-leur de signer la lettre ouverte et faite le aussi. Si cette page n'est pas disponible dans votre langue locale aidez-nous à la traduire.

Aidez nous à améliorer notre lettre d'information

Si vous souhaitez partager vos idées, des illustrations ou des nouvelles, vous pouvez nous les soumettre. Comme toujours, l'adresse est newsletter@fsfe.org. Nous nous réjouissons d'avoir de vos nouvelles !

Merci à notre communauté, à tous les bénévoles, soutiens et donateursqui rendent notre travail possible. Merci à nos groupes de traductions grâce à qui vous pouvez lire ce bulletin d'information dans votre langue maternelle.

Votre éditeur, Erik Albers

Aidez nous à grandir et à faire la différence en 2017

Support FSFE, join the Fellowship
Make a one time donation

FSFE Lettre d'information - Septembre 2017

dim, 17/09/2017 - 19:00
FSFE Lettre d'information - Septembre 2017Argent Public ? Code Public !

Les services numériques proposés et utilisés par nos administrations publiques font partie des infrastructures vitales des nations démocratiques du 21ème siècle. Néanmoins, à cause de licences de logiciels restrictives, de nombreuses entités publiques n'ont pas un contrôle total sur leur infrastructure numérique. Même si la publication d'un logiciel financé par de l'argent public sous une licence libre engendre de nombreux bénéfices pour les gouvernements et la société civile, les responsables politiques sont réticents à améliorer la législation à ce sujet. Il est temps que cela change. À la FSFE, nous voulons une législation qui exige que les logiciels développés pour le secteur public et financés par de l'argent public soient mis à disposition sous une licence libre et open source. Si c'est de l'argent public, cela doit aussi être du code public !

Pour appuyer notre demande, la FSFE a lancé une nouvelle campagne la semaine dernière : "Public Money Public Code" (Argent Public Code Public. La campagne explique avec une courte vidéo et une lettre ouverte à signer les avantages de publier sous licence libre les logiciels financés par les fonds publics. La campagne et la lettre ouverte seront utilisées au cours des prochains mois et jusqu'aux élections du Parlement européen qui auront lieu en 2019, pour mettre en évidence les bons et les mauvais exemples de développement de logiciels financés par des fonds publics ainsi que leur réutilisation potentielle.

Débuté avec succès, le lancement de la campagne a été relayé par de nombreux sites Web et magazines d'information en Europe. Au moment d'écrire ces lignes, la Lettre Ouverte a déjà été signée par plus de 35 organisations et par plus de 5000 personnes. Plusieurs politiciens et d'autres personnalités publiques ont ouvertement annoncé leur soutien à la campagne, dont Edward Snowden, président de la Fondation Liberté de la presse :

"L'argent public ne devrait pas servir à écrire des logiciels que le public ne sera pas autorisé à corriger. Signez la lettre, sauvez le monde :https://publiccode.eu/#action #PublicCode"

Signez la lettre ouverte et soutenez également un code public  : https://publiccode.eu/#action

La FSFE publie les bonnes pratiques en matière de licences logicielles

Si vous voulez que d'autres puissent utiliser votre code, vous devez inclure une licence, et le faire de la meilleure manière possible afin qu'elle puisse être comprise par les humains et les ordinateurs. Malheureusement, une infinité de logiciels et d'innombrables extraits de codes sont disponibles en accès libre mais sans toujours une licence appropriée. Une des raisons étant que le fait d'inclure une licence à un logiciel de manière cohérente et compréhensible peut parfois représenter un vrai défi. Faire comprendre votre licence à un ordinateur peut s'avérer encore plus difficile.

C'est pour cette raison que la FSFE a travaillé à rendre la gestion des droits d'auteur et des licences de Logiciel Libre plus facile. Notre Guide des bonnes pratiques pour l'utilisation de licences pour les logiciels («  Software Licensing Best Practices guide   ») va vous aider à inclure une licence et une note de droit d'auteur dans votre logiciel. Et alors que l'on est toujours en train d'évaluer ces bonnes pratiques, vous trouverez déjà à l'adresse https://reuse.software/ quelques mesures à prendre pour rendre la licence et les droits d'auteur plus facile à utiliser.

Dans la version en ligne vous trouverez une photo ici : Le village FSFE durant le SHA Camp 2017 au Pays-Bas. https://fsfe.org/news/nl/nl-201709

Aidez nous à grandir et à faire la différence en 2017.

Qu'avons-nous fait d'autres ? A l'intérieur ou à l'extérieur de la FSFE Les propositions de la Directive Européenne des droits d'auteurs restreignent les droits des développeurs et des utilisateurs d'internet, créant des barrières au développement de code source. En coopération avec l' Open Forum Europe, la FSFE a écrit un livre blanc afin d'aider chaque personne à percevoir la totalité des enjeux du point de vue du développeur de logiciels. Nous allons lancer une campagne dans le cours du mois, mais vous pouvez déjà aider à sensibiliser l'opinion en partageant largement le lien vers Save Code Share. Le directeur exécutif de la FSFE, Jonas Öberg, a publié un billet sur son blog à propos du budget annuel de la FSFE, comment nos finances sont structurées et où passe l'argent. La «  Koalition Freies Wissen » (Coalition du Savoir Libre) a créé le « Digital-O-Mat » , un outil en ligne pour informer les électeurs sur les élections fédérales allemandes du 24 septembre 2017. Le Digital-O-Mat (allemand) souligne les différentes positions des partis à propos des sujets qui sont importants pour la politique et la structure d'internet, comme le Logiciel Libre, et aident les électeurs à trouver le parti qui leur convient le mieux pour l'élection du parlement allemand. L'équipe Allemagne de la FSFE a envoyé le questionnaire «Interrogez vos candidats» aux participants des partis du Bundestagswahl (les élections fédérales allemande) et a publié et analysé leurs réponses.. (Allemand) L'équipe Pays-Bas de la FSFE était présente avec un village au SHA Camp, un camp hacker sans but lucratif au Pays-Bas. Pendant les cinq jours, ce village a offert un espace de discussions, de rencontres, de karaoké, et un abri. La FSFE avait son propre village qui a proposé de multiples sessions auto-gérées, ainsi qu'une chorale de chant "Logiciel Libre" et un festival d'installation de FreedomBox. L'équipe Grecque de la FSFE a soutenu la première édition du Re:publica in Thessaloniki, une conférence sur la culture numérique. Le groupe de la FSFE de Mayence/Rhin (« Rhein/Main ») était présent avec un stand à Froscon, une conférence sur le Logiciel Libre à l'Université de Sciences appliquées Bonn-Rhein-Sieg, en Allemagne. Le président de la FSFE Matthias Kirschner a également fait une présentation intitulée « Limux: das Ende eines Leuchtturm-Projekts!? »(Limux: la fin d'un projet phare!?). (allemand) En avril dernier, le Digital Society Institute a accueilli un colloque pour analyser le thème « Est-ce que les Logiciels Libres sont sûrs ? Les annales de la sécurité des Logiciels libres et open sourcet ». La rencontre comprenait une intervention de Matthias Kirschner qui est maintenant disponible en anglais et en allemand et inclut des recommandations pour le secteur privé et public. Nous sommes ravi d’accueillir 3 nouveaux stagiaires : Carmen Bianca Bakker, Kristi Progri et Erik Da Silva. Si vous êtes intéressé par un stage avec nous, trouvez plus d'informations sur nos pages. Nous avons un nouvel article dans la boutique en ligne de la FSFE : une bavette rose non-binaire avec le slogan « I am a fork » (je suis un embranchement) cousue sur le bavoir. Équitable et biologique. À ne pas manquer  ! Événements à venir avec la FSFE

Les 28 et 29 septembre, se tiendra le CopyCamp à Varsovie. CopyCamp est une conférence qui vise à interroger comment les droits exclusifs immatériels modifient la culture, l'éducation, la science et les Logiciels Libres. Mathias Kirschner parlera de «  Limux: la perte d'un projet phare   » et notre analyste politique Polina Malaja présentera « La réforme européenne des droits de reproduction et son incidence pour le développement collaboratif de logiciel ». Il n'y a pas de prix d'entrée, mais il est demandé aux personnes qui souhaitent participer de bien vouloir s’inscrire . Grâce à la fondation pour la Coopération Germano-Polonaise, il y a des bourses de voyage disponibles pour les personnes qui résident en Allemagne, offertes par le Ministères des affaires étrangères allemand

Agissez

Venez voir notre page «  Public Money Public Code  » et la vidéo-PMPC et partagez-les avec vos amis, collègues et vos listes de diffusion préférées. Demandez-leur de signer la lettre ouverte et faite le aussi. Si cette page n'est pas disponible dans votre langue locale aidez-nous à la traduire.

Aidez nous à améliorer notre lettre d'information

Si vous souhaitez partager vos idées, des illustrations ou des nouvelles, vous pouvez nous les soumettre. Comme toujours, l'adresse est newsletter@fsfe.org. Nous nous réjouissons d'avoir de vos nouvelles !

Merci à notre communauté, à tous les bénévoles, soutiens et donateursqui rendent notre travail possible. Merci à nos groupes de traductions grâce à qui vous pouvez lire ce bulletin d'information dans votre langue maternelle.

Votre éditeur, Erik Albers

Aidez nous à grandir et à faire la différence en 2017

Support FSFE, join the Fellowship
Make a one time donation

Pages